Horsepower: The horsepower measurement, often shortened to HP, describes the power the garage door opener motor has. A motor with a greater horsepower measurement will open and close the door more quickly, while also being able to handle larger and heavier doors. Motors between 1/2 HP and 1 HP are the most common for residential garages, FeldCo says.
The typical electric garage door opener consists of a power unit that contains the electric motor. The power unit attaches to a track. A trolley connected to an arm that attaches to the top of the garage door slides back and forth on the track, thus opening and closing the garage door. The trolley is pulled along the track by a chain, belt, or screw that turns when the motor is operated. A quick-release mechanism is attached to the trolley to allow the garage door to be disconnected from the opener for manual operation during a power failure or in case of emergency. Limit switches on the power unit control the distance the garage door opens and closes once the motor receives a signal from the remote control or wall push button to operate the door.[3]

Over the past 15 years, we've been providing professional garage door repair and services to families across the Lehigh Valley and Western New Jersey. We're a family-owned business, and we treat every customer as if they are family as well. We pride ourselves on our dedication to exceptional service. If you are having an issue with your garage door, we can help! We service ALL makes and models of garage doors and openers. Whether you need a repair, a replacement, or routine maintenance, you can rely on us to get the job done at an affordable price.

The Heavy Duty Chain Extension Kit for 8 The Heavy Duty Chain Extension Kit for 8 ft. High Garage Doors is required for reliable everyday operation of Chamberlain heavy duty chain drive models in 8 ft. garage door applications. Featuring a quick-install extension rail and replacement chain the kit includes everything needed for quick and easy installation. Includes ...  More + Product Details Close

When garage door repair isn’t an option — perhaps the current door is beyond fixing or you want to upgrade to a quieter, more energy-efficient model — it’s time to buy a new one. But choosing a garage door is not as simple as it sounds, even when you know the right size for your home. A wide range of materials, styles and finishes are available, and each factor influences the cost. Garage doors are made of aluminum, steel, vinyl, fiberglass, masonite, wood (typically cedar or mahogany), or a composite of several materials. They may be insulated against cold or heat. Traditional and modern styles include raised panel, carriage house or crossbuck. Most styles have window or arch options, and are available in different wood finishes and neutral colors. Because garage doors account for a large part of a home’s exterior, their appearance is usually a homeowner’s top priority. An attractive garage door can increase a home’s curb appeal and resale value.
The "safety issue" trick: Another tip-off is the use of language like "safety issue". This is meant to trump any objections you might have to a costly repair bill. Don't be manipulated by the suggestion that you are risking disaster if you don't buy something expensive. Even if you think the risk is genuine, get another estimate, and tell the second repairman you are skeptical; every technician loves to prove the competition made a mistake.
Resetting the drums, if needed: If the drums were incorrectly set in their old positions, one must reset both drums in new positions on the shaft. This is complicated by the presence of old dimples in the torsion shaft from previous setting(s), which must be avoided lest they improperly influence the new setting of the drums. To begin this process of resetting the drums, the door must first be lowered and resting level on the floor, the spring(s) must be in the unwound condition with their set-screws loosened, and the lift cables wrapped around the drums. If for some reason the door does not rest level on the floor, such as the floor being uneven, then insert temporary shims between the door bottom and the floor to bring the door up to level. Loosen the set-screws on the drums, and turn the torsion shaft to avoid the old dimples from the set-screws in the old drum position. Tighten the set-screw on the left drum (that is, on your left as you face the door from in the garage), creating a new dimple, and apply tension to its cable with the locking-pliers technique, enough tension to keep the cable taut but not enough to start to move the door up. Attach and wind the cable on the opposite (right) drum by hand until the cable is similarly taut, and set the screw, remembering that tightening the screw will tend to add a bit of extra tension to the cable. Both drums should now be fixed on the torsion shaft, with the cables about equally taut (listen to the sound when you pluck them like a guitar string) and the door still level on the ground. Setting the left drum first, and the right drum second, will allow you to take up any slack in the cable introduced by the left drum rotating slightly with respect to the torsion shaft as you tighten the set screws. This alignment and balance of the cables, drums, and door is critical to smooth operation and proper closing. If you have a single-spring assembly, the distance along the torsion tube from the spring cone to one drum is longer than to the other drum, which allows a bit more twist to one side than the other, and you may have to compensate with the setting of the drums.

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