An entry may be the central tremendous moving piece of your home. It obliges routine upkeep practices to verify that it serves you for long, and chances of incidents are diminished. You will unquestionably take note that there are things you can do without anyone else to guarantee that it stays fit as a fiddle. However, when there is an issue, it is always recommended to call Local Garage Door Repair, Inc . When you select to do it independent from anyone else, without the obliged experience, you may end up exacerbating the issue or doing harm yourself and people around you.

Clopay Garage doors featuring Intellicore insulation technology represent Clopay Garage doors featuring Intellicore insulation technology represent the ultimate smart choice for homeowners. Clopay Intellicore is proprietary polyurethane foam that is injected into a garage door expanding to fill the entire structure. The result is a door with incredible strength and durability. Its dense insulation also produces a quieter ...  More + Product Details Close
Ryan Fleming, Technician with Precision Door replaced a broken garage door spring at our home last night and I was so impressed with his knowledge, professionalism and positive attitude that I felt compelled to write this review. We have been customers of Precision Door for over 5 years and have always been pleased with how promptly and cost effectively they perform repair and maintenance work. I highly recommend both Ryan and Precision Door.read more
Trading wire size for length, diameter, or cycle life: Now we are really going to save you some money, if you just recall your high school algebra class (and I don't mean that cute cheerleader who sat next to you). If you further understand the role of the 4th power of the spring wire size (letter d in the formulas above) in the numerator of the spring rate formula, and how to increase or decrease d to compensate for changes in length, diameter, and cycle life, then you're qualified for elite spring calculations. Matching springs is a matter of equating the 4th power of the proportion in wire size change to the proportion of change in the diameter or length or the product of both diameter and length. However, it is usually best to only increase wire size when substituting a spring, since this does not derate the cycle life. If you observe that the formula for bending stress is proportionate to the inverse 3rd power of the diameter, then physically a proportionate increase in wire size will result in a dramatic increase in cycle life of the 3rd power of that proportion. Trade-off example: Yawn with me while we ponder my original spring once more. Let's say I was in a fit of engineering mania, and wanted to replace my spring having a 0.2253 inch diameter wire (d = 0.2253) with a 0.262 wire version (d = 0.262). How much longer is the spring with equal torque rate, assuming we use the same coil diameter? The proportion of this change is 0.262/0.2253 = 1.163, and the 4th power of that is 1.83. This means the length must increase by a factor of 1.83 (again, not counting dead coils). Recalling that the length in Example 1 was 102 non-dead coils, the heavier wire spring must be about 1.83*102 = 187 coils, which when adding 5 dead coils and multiplying by the wire size to get the overall length, is (187+5)*0.262 = 50 inches, versus 24 inches in the original. So using this heavier wire more than doubles the length (and thus the mass and thus the cost). While the cost about doubles, the stress goes down by the inverse 3rd power of the wire size proportion, or 1/(1.163**3) = 0.64. Sress is favorably, non-linearly related to cycle lifetime (halving the stress more than doubles the lifetime), so this decreased stress should more than double the expected lifetime of the spring. While the up-front cost is more, the true cost of an amortized lifetime is much less. In short, per cycle it is cheaper. Ah, the wonders of engineering calculations! Conclusion: Observe that the stress formula (and thus the cycle lifetime) depends only on wire diameter (d) for equal torques. Thus the only way to improve cycle lifetime is to use heavier wire. For equal torques, heavier wire size, due to the exponents in the formulas, increases cycle lifetime much faster than it increases mass (and thus cost), physically speaking.
Having a mismatched pair makes it difficult to specify the correct matched-pair replacements. To obtain replacement springs for a mismatched pair, you can either specify the same odd pair, try to calculate the equivalent matched pair sizes, or (this is the best method:) measure an accurate door weight and calculate the right spring size(s) "from scratch". The spring seller should be able to do the calculations from your accurate measurements of weight, height, and drum size; or you can attempt the calculations yourself using my engineering formulas below.

Wayne Dalton garage doors are some of the best in the industry. We offer a large selection of garage door designs in many colors and options that can drastically enhance your home’s curb appeal. Not only will a new garage door add beauty to your home, but replacing an old or outdated door with a new one can increase your home’s value. Did you know that year after year replacing the garage door is one of the top home improvement projects for return on investment? Purchasing a new garage door for your home is an excellent investment and we’ve made it even easier to find the perfect door with our Garage Door Design Center or Garage Door Selection Guide.


Through our garage door configurator by Clopay, you can design, visualize and purchase a new Clopay garage door. Upload a photo of your home and then browse the configurator to see which style works for you. Choose from a variety of designs, textures, colors, finishes, window options and decorative hardware. You’re able to easily and quickly see the transformation, and then make it a reality.
Good customer service is important for any product, but it is especially important for the class of garage door openers we considered. We looked primarily at models designed to be installed by a homeowner, not a professional. Even if you consider yourself to be pretty handy, you are sure to have questions at some point along the way. As such, we looked for companies that respond to all inquiries as well as for resources, such as a downloadable manual, to help with installation.
All measurements should be in feet and inches. Step 1, measure across the existing door or desired space for the width, then up and down for the height. The rough opening of your space should be the same size as the door. Step 2, measure the sideroom, which is the space beside your door. Measure the width of the left side, and then the width of the right side. Step 3, measure the space above the door, which is called the headroom. Measure the height of the distance between the top of the door opening and the ceiling. Step 4, measure the ceiling, which is called the backroom. You’ll need to measure the distance of the garage door opening toward the back wall of your garage. You should have 6 total measurements in all once you’ve finished measuring the space. Keep in mind that having an automatic garage door opener installed might call for additional backroom or ceiling space.
Resetting the drums, if needed: If the drums were incorrectly set in their old positions, one must reset both drums in new positions on the shaft. This is complicated by the presence of old dimples in the torsion shaft from previous setting(s), which must be avoided lest they improperly influence the new setting of the drums. To begin this process of resetting the drums, the door must first be lowered and resting level on the floor, the spring(s) must be in the unwound condition with their set-screws loosened, and the lift cables wrapped around the drums. If for some reason the door does not rest level on the floor, such as the floor being uneven, then insert temporary shims between the door bottom and the floor to bring the door up to level. Loosen the set-screws on the drums, and turn the torsion shaft to avoid the old dimples from the set-screws in the old drum position. Tighten the set-screw on the left drum (that is, on your left as you face the door from in the garage), creating a new dimple, and apply tension to its cable with the locking-pliers technique, enough tension to keep the cable taut but not enough to start to move the door up. Attach and wind the cable on the opposite (right) drum by hand until the cable is similarly taut, and set the screw, remembering that tightening the screw will tend to add a bit of extra tension to the cable. Both drums should now be fixed on the torsion shaft, with the cables about equally taut (listen to the sound when you pluck them like a guitar string) and the door still level on the ground. Setting the left drum first, and the right drum second, will allow you to take up any slack in the cable introduced by the left drum rotating slightly with respect to the torsion shaft as you tighten the set screws. This alignment and balance of the cables, drums, and door is critical to smooth operation and proper closing. If you have a single-spring assembly, the distance along the torsion tube from the spring cone to one drum is longer than to the other drum, which allows a bit more twist to one side than the other, and you may have to compensate with the setting of the drums.

Garage Door Service Co

×