Most styles, whether traditional or contemporary, feature panels, trim, and other detailing. Doors with true frame-and-panel construction tend to be sturdier than those with decorative detail that is merely glued or nailed on. Many styles have glass panels on the top row, which looks inviting from the street and brings daylight inside. You can also find roll-up doors with shatterproof glass or frosted plastic in all the panels, for a more modern look.

In each of our branches, we have the best team of expert professionals who know how to handle each and every type of garage door and its components. This is because all of our technicians go through a rigorous training process, covering every known garage door repair technique. We do not let them onto the field until we know that they are completely trained, and can perform a job to perfection. Aside from this, they are continually updated with all the latest knowledge, information and training in order to do their work efficiently.
Are you needing garage door repair? Has your garage door opener stopped working, or are you looking to boost your curb appeal? Whatever your garage door need may be, your local authorized Overhead Door™ Distributor is there to assist. You can find the nearest Overhead Door™ Distributor near you today by using our Distributor Locator​ to search your area. ​​
You depend on your garage doors to provide safety and security at your home or office. They are also great for enhancing your property’s curb appeal and increasing its value. With their many moving parts and how they operate, you must have access to a reliable service company when something goes wrong. Houston residents and businesses trust us to make sure their garage doors will work when they need it to.

Garage Door Service Company


I've provided this information for free, in hopes it will help you either fix your door yourself, or find a competent professional service to do it for you at a reasonable price. If you've been helped by this Web page, as many have, all I would ask is that you create a link to this page (http://www.truetex.com/garage.htm) from any pages you maintain. You will thereby help others searching for complete and reliable information on this type of repair to find it with a Web search.
However, in addition to potentially causing injuries to the under-prepared DIYer, a malfunctioning door can become a safety hazard to you and your family. Keep in mind, according to the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS), over 13000 people checked into hospitals with garage related injuries in the United States in 2007. You don’t want to turn a loved one into a statistic just to save a few dollars!
Recently another type of opener, known as the jackshaft opener, has become more popular. This style of opener was used frequently on commercial doors but in recent years has been adapted for residential use. This style of opener consists of a motor that attaches to the side of the torsion rod and moves the door up and down by simply spinning the rod. These openers need a few extra components to function safely for residential use. These include a cable tension monitor, to detect when a cable is broken, and a separate locking mechanism to lock the door when it is fully closed. These have the advantage that they free up ceiling space that an ordinary opener and rail would occupy. These also have the disadvantage that the door must have a torsion rod to attach the motor to.

Most doors come with electric door openers. After a while these openers malfunction and need to be replaced. If your opener is broken, you're in luck. These repairs don't cost very much and can be replaced easily. You might even be able to do it yourself. Learn how to replace your garage door opener in 15 minutes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HeaR6Yhx6IY.


This page is a description of how I replaced torsion springs on a garage door. You may find that my experience either frightens you from trying such a stunt yourself, or encourages you to give it a try. You may curse me for revealing the techniques supposedly known only to the trade, or perhaps thank me for explaining how it's done. All the secrets are revealed below. Even if you hire this work out, just knowing how it is done will help you shop for the best deal and avoid falling prey to overcharging tricks.

As in an elevator, the electric motor does not provide most of the power to move a heavy garage door. Instead, most of door's weight is offset by the counterbalance springs attached to the door. (Even manually operated garage doors have counterbalances; otherwise they would be too heavy for a person to open or close them.) In a typical design, torsion springs apply torque to a shaft, and that shaft applies a force to the garage door via steel counterbalance cables. The electric opener provides only a small amount of force to control how far the door opens and closes. In most cases, the garage door opener also holds the door closed in place of a lock.
In the photo, you can see an extra lag screw on the bottom of the plate, reinforcing weak anchoring from the original two screws (hidden behind the springs). This extra screw was applied by a professional garage door technician on a previous repair visit. I have since replaced the backing with a sound plywood panel anchored into the concrete door header. Since these bolts clamp all the opposing torsion to the wall, the attachment must be sturdy.
The electric overhead garage door opener was invented by C.G. Johnson in 1926 in Hartford City, Indiana.[1] Electric Garage Door openers did not become popular until Era Meter Company of Chicago offered one after World War II where the overhead garage door could be opened via a key pad located on a post at the end of the driveway or a switch inside the garage.[2]
Given the complexity of a garage door and opener system, there are a variety of different areas something could go wrong. If your garage door shakes or is very loud during operation, the garage door closes all the way only to immediately open back up, the garage door opens slowly or closes too quickly, or the garage door opener and remote aren't working at all, you should seek help from a professional garage door repair specialist.
As noted above, set-screw clamping may have distorted the cross-section of the shaft and made it difficult to slide off all the hardware. With the shaft on the floor, it may be possible to restore enough roundness to proceed, using compensating clamping force to the distorted area via a machinist's vise, an arbor press, a hydraulic shop press, etc., on the shaft body. Burrs and other slight distortions on the shaft can be filed off with a hand file or touched with an abrasive wheel on an angle grinder. At some point, the condition of the shaft may just be degraded enough that it ought to be replaced.

Next, the torsion shaft is reassembled with the new springs, the drums repositioned loosely on the shaft, this whole assembly slid back into the end bearings, and the drum set-screws tightened down. I tightened the set-screws about 1/2 or 3/4 of a turn after contact with the shaft, which provides a good grip, but does not distort the shaft. The drums can be set on their old positions, if they were correctly installed, which is snug up against the end bearings to remove any longitudinal play in the torsion shaft. Now the lift cable can be reattached to the drums, and a slight temporary torque applied to the shaft to keep the cable taut while the first spring is wound. This temporary torque is conveniently applied with a pair of locking pliers clamped on the shaft, positioned such that they hold the torque by pressing lightly against the wall above the door, before you start the spring winding, The locking pliers stay on the torsion shaft until you have finished the spring winding locked down the spring cone(s) with the setscrew(s), and removed the winding bars. Then you simply remove them with the release on the wrench handle. I feel that any job that doesn't require a trick manipulation with either locking pliers or duct tape (or in the ultimate case, both!) is just too boring. My trusty pliers look a trifle rusty ever since I used them to clamp something on my outdoor TV antenna "temporarily" and left them out in the weather for, oh, several years. The white stuff on the drum is paint overspray from the original painting of the garage interior.
Charlotte, NC is  a bustling market for new homes, business construction and restoring old homes.  Charlotte’s real estate market is booming. Our company has been a part of this growth by installing and repairing over 50,000 garage doors since 2001. In this span of time, we have had no issues with the county inspections office. We have done this by making sure that our clients buy the right doors, and have permits in place, if needed. Keep in mind that we are not general contractors, so we do not supply permits, but we provide the information and resources for you to easily apply for permits if one is needed for your project.
They sent Doug Fussell out to my house on the day after Christmas! I had only called them three days before! Doug was a premier technician, very thorough and very efficient. I expected him to take two days, since he was replacing two doors and adding openers on each door. He only took the daylight hours of one day! I could not believe how fast he was! In addition, he thoroughly taught me how to use the remote openers. I highly recommend them to anyone!
Here's a view of my door and its broken torsion spring. This door is 10 feet wide and 7 feet high, constructed of 3/4 thick hollow wood panels inside with 3/4 inch plywood siding outside to match the house exterior. This is original to the house which was constructed in 1978, and is much heavier (238 pounds, as I measured later as described below) than the steel doors most common today in new construction. The 10-foot width is a little larger than usual for a one-car garage; such doors are typically only 7 or 9 feet wide. The ceiling height is 9 feet, providing 18 inches clearance above the torsion shaft. This is in a 3-car garage with 3 separate extra-wide doors. Every man's dream! ('cept when the door is broke.)
Overhead Door® openers​ and garage doors are built with longevity in-mind. By performing a few routine tasks, you can help ensure your garage door system stays safe and stands the test of time. One important part of garage door system routine maintenance is to make sure the photo-eyes have not gone out of alignment. The photo-eyes are the infrared sensors which monitor whether the space at the bottom of your garage door is clear. When these sensors are not lined up properly they will keep your door from closing. Make sure to occasionally check your photo-eyes’ alignment to ensure they are correctly detecting obstructions to keep your garage door safe and operating properly.
The various increments of standard wire sizes differ by only about 0.010 inch, so calipers or a micrometer would be the tool to use to be certain of the stepped size you have, or else a trustworthy ruler marked in tenths of an inch to use the measure-10-turns-and-divide-by-10 trick. The most common wire sizes in the US are 0.207", 0.218", 0.225", 0.234", 0.243", 0.250", and 0.262".
Most wood doors are sectional roll-up doors, though a swing-up wood door that’s meant to be painted can be affordably built in the driveway from a wood framework and plywood. Custom wood doors are typically made of durable softwoods such as Douglas fir, cedar, redwood or cypress, or from hardwoods such as oak or mahogany. Appearance-grade hardwoods are relatively expensive.
Lift cable placement: On the standard residential door mechanism, the loops at the lower ends of the two lift cables loop over the two bottom roller shafts which project from the bottom bracket on the door. The upper cable ends fasten to the drums using one of the methods described above. The drums are positioned along the torsion shaft such that the inner edge of each drum is approximately over the edge of the door. The cable winds onto the drum from outside in, so at the top of travel the cable is winding onto the inner edge of the drum, vertical from the edge of the door where it is looped over the roller shaft. As the door is lowered, the cable winds out to the outer edge of the drum, and thus is a bit out from the vertical, but the cable still falls in the gap between the guide rails and door edge. My cables rub and slap on the rails a bit, but after 30 years and many 10,000s of cycles, they don't seem to have worn at all.

Here are the winding rods inserted in the winding cone of the unbroken old spring, posed just for a picture. Note that I have carefully placed a sturdy, steady ladder just clear of the swing of the rods, such that when I am standing on the lower rungs to reach the rods, that my head and body are clear of the "kill zone" around the spring and cone. You must have a trustworthy platform to stand on, because a slip or shake of the ladder while you are winding can cause you to lose your socketed attachment to the cone, letting loose the spring. I would not trust an ordinary household step ladder for this purpose.
A standard double garage door is 7 ft. high by 16 ft. wide. Standard single doors are 7 ft. high by 8 or 9 ft. wide. Because the doors are so large, few home centers and only some garage door stores keep many doors in stock, so expect to order one instead of buying it off the shelf. Garage doors are available in wood, fiberglass and steel. Steel doors, like ours, are light, maintenance-free, affordable, readily available, and have an insulating value as high as R-19.
Your garage door is most likely the largest opening on your home, and as a result, it can affect your home’s energy efficiency. For homes in areas that experience colder winters or warmer summers, choosing an insulated door can save you money and improve the comfort of your home. Doors insulated with our Intellicore® insulation technology operate more quietly and are more durable. We also offer insulated glass window options that can help maintain energy efficiency and allow natural light into your garage. Visit our insulation guide to learn more about garage door insulation, or learn more about Intellicore® here.
Give your garage a great look with garage doors from Menards®. Menards® has all the supplies, tools, and accessories you need to install a stylish new garage door. Choose the perfect door from our selection of residential and commercial garage doors as well as roll-up doors for storage sheds. At Menards®, you will find a wide variety of door sizes ranging from 4 feet to 9 feet wide, 10 feet to 16 feet wide, and over 16 feet wide. Because of the layer of insulation, insulated garage doors are generally quieter than noninsulated doors. Insulated doors also offer improved energy efficiency, so you can stay comfortable while working in the garage no matter what the weather's like outside.
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