When you’re thinking about replacing your garage door, there are many options to consider. Picking out materials and styles is sometimes stressful for homeowners. Neighborhood Garage Door Repair has some helpful tips on choosing the right material for your door. Garage Door Materials Manufacturers offer different materials when it comes to designing a garage door. […]

An extension spring counterbalance system consists of a pair of stretched springs running parallel to the horizontal tracks. The springs lift the door through a system of pulleys and counterbalance cables running from the bottom corner brackets through the pulleys. When the door is raised, the springs contract, thus lifting the door as the tension is released. Typically these springs are made of 11 gauge galvanized steel, and the lengths of these springs are based on the height of the garage door in question. Their lifting weight capacity can best be identified by the color that is painted on the ends of the springs.
My garage door broke on a Saturday night as I was getting ready to leave for a holiday party. Kelvin was here within 30 minutes. He reviewed everything with me that was happening with my door. He gave me the estimates of what was immediately needed to be done in order for my door to raise and then what I will need to have done very soon. I could see all the problems he pointed out to me and I decided to have everything done. He completed everything that night. I was very satisfied with Kelvin’s professionalism and the work he did. Thank you again.
The two set-screws in the winding cones have a 3/8-inch square head, which fits a 3/8-inch open-end wrench or 8-point socket, or a 7/16-inch 12-point socket or 12-point closed-end wrench. I carried an extra wrench in my pocket while winding, since I didn't want to be holding a wound spring that I couldn't set because I had dropped the wrench (although one could rest the winding rod against the door in this case while picking up a dropped tool).

End treatments: Torsion springs also are made in a variety of end treatments. The "standard torsion end" is most common, as is pictured in my examples, consisting simply of a short, straight length of wire projecting tangentially. Various non-standard end treatments have longer "ears", U-turns, ends bent in toward the center or along the axis, or even loops. Non-standard ends are used in end fasteners peculiar to various manufacturers, which would seem to serve mostly as a guarantee that you buy overpriced replacements from that one source.
There are plenty of garage door accessories to make your garage safer. Sears carries replacement safety sensors that will detect anything in the way and keep it from shutting. If you have a small garage or it's full of gardening equipment, a laser parking assistant will help you find the perfect spot every time. You can set it so it hits the perfect spot on your dash as you pull in. You'll also be able to find new tracks to replace worn opener tracks.
Note the left winding cone with red spray paint. This shpritz of paint is applied to create fear and doubt in the mind of the do-it-yourselfer. Sometimes it is a color code for the wire size (using a DASMA standard, red indicating 0.2253 inch diameter wire). Sometimes it indicates the winding direction: red may indicate right-hand winding, but don't rely on that; do you own independent analysis. Sometimes it is a manufacturer's private code for another dimension than wire size. This color code is for the installer's information when the spring is new; I would not depend on interpreting the color code properly on an old spring, since one can't be certain of a correct interpretation without documentation from the original supplier.
These springs weighed in at just over 9 pounds each, including the winding cones. They are covered with a light film of oil, and at this point the job starts to get messy. The manufacturer has painted them with a "225B24" part number, which no doubt indicates the 0.2253 inch wire size, 24 inches long. Perhaps the "B" indicates the 2-inch inside diameter. Both the left- and right-hand springs have this same number on them.
If this manipulative, we-are-your-nanny business approach is truly in our best interests as consumers, then we shouldn't be allowed near ladders, lawn mowers, or power tools. Those products are just as hazardous and prone to misuse as torsion springs, yet no one thinks of them as forbidden. The only genuine difference is that torsion springs are a hazardous thing you need only rarely, while a lawn mower is a hazardous thing you need all the time.
We offer wide range of stainless metal appliqués. Brushed metal effect or painted any RAL colour. Appliqués will suit most demanding design requirements. If you can’t find what you like an option could be your personal design appliqué. Just send a picture or drawing and we will replicate it on your door. Use our recommended designs or create your own:
Typically, it will cost less to install a steel garage door without an opener than to install a custom wood door with a garage door opener. Recent innovations have also yielded high-tech doors with thick insulation and energy-efficient glaze, as well as finished interior surfaces and other significant upgrades. These are more expensive doors, but they are also extremely durable.
Here is what a winding cone looks like without the spring. The threads that grip the inside of the spring coils are ambidextrous, so you can use the same part on either right- or left-hand-wound springs. The cone size is specific for a certain inner diameter of springs, so if you have the wrong size, the cone will slip inside the spring (cone too small), or not fit (cone too big).

The second stage of the wireless garage door opener system solved the opening-the-neighbor's-garage-door problem. The remote controls on these systems transmitted a digital code, and the receiver in the garage responded only to that code. The codes were typically set by eight to twelve DIP switches on the receiver and transmitter, so they allowed for 28 = 256 to 212 = 4,096 different codes. As long as neighbors used different codes, they would not open each other's garage doors. The intent of these systems was to avoid interference with nearby garage doors; the systems were not designed with security in mind. Intruders were able to defeat the security of these systems and gain entry to the garage and the house. The number of codes was small enough that even an unsophisticated intruder with a compatible remote control transmitter could just start transmitting all possible codes until he found one that opened the door. More sophisticated intruders could acquire a black box master key that automatically transmitted every possible code in a short time. An even more sophisticated method is known as a replay attack. The attacker would use a code grabber, which has a receiver that captures the remote's digital code and can retransmit that digital code at a later time. The attacker with a code grabber would wait nearby for the homeowner to use his remote, capture the code, and then replay the code to open the door when the homeowner was gone. Multicode openers became unpopular in areas where security was important, but due to their ease of programming, such openers are often used to operate such things as the gates in gated apartment complexes.
Resetting the drums, if needed: If the drums were incorrectly set in their old positions, one must reset both drums in new positions on the shaft. This is complicated by the presence of old dimples in the torsion shaft from previous setting(s), which must be avoided lest they improperly influence the new setting of the drums. To begin this process of resetting the drums, the door must first be lowered and resting level on the floor, the spring(s) must be in the unwound condition with their set-screws loosened, and the lift cables wrapped around the drums. If for some reason the door does not rest level on the floor, such as the floor being uneven, then insert temporary shims between the door bottom and the floor to bring the door up to level. Loosen the set-screws on the drums, and turn the torsion shaft to avoid the old dimples from the set-screws in the old drum position. Tighten the set-screw on the left drum (that is, on your left as you face the door from in the garage), creating a new dimple, and apply tension to its cable with the locking-pliers technique, enough tension to keep the cable taut but not enough to start to move the door up. Attach and wind the cable on the opposite (right) drum by hand until the cable is similarly taut, and set the screw, remembering that tightening the screw will tend to add a bit of extra tension to the cable. Both drums should now be fixed on the torsion shaft, with the cables about equally taut (listen to the sound when you pluck them like a guitar string) and the door still level on the ground. Setting the left drum first, and the right drum second, will allow you to take up any slack in the cable introduced by the left drum rotating slightly with respect to the torsion shaft as you tighten the set screws. This alignment and balance of the cables, drums, and door is critical to smooth operation and proper closing. If you have a single-spring assembly, the distance along the torsion tube from the spring cone to one drum is longer than to the other drum, which allows a bit more twist to one side than the other, and you may have to compensate with the setting of the drums.
GUESS YOU DON’T CARE to reply to my emails, so I'm posting it up here..... On Sep 8, 2018, at 2:52 PM, Joe Turiczek wrote: Thanks for the invoice, thanks for the service, thanks for the rapid response, thanks for Chris (the tech), but one note….. I’m a really handy guy, I repair and maintain nearly everything around the house, I am very mechanically adept, and I am also a highly skilled technical person that runs my own business by trade. I would have and could have repaired the belt myself, but I am traveling for business sooner than I could have ordered a belt, and did the repair….which means, I looked at the belts, I watched all the videos, it’s an EASY repair. I have belts down to a science, I’m really not an armchair DIY repair guy, I’m pretty good……That being said, I also shopped for prices of new belts for at least 30 mins or better, across easily 20-30 different parts and/or repair websites. Why am I telling you this? Because I think Chris, and your labor prices are spot on, and he deserved every cent, and your labor billing is more than fair…..however, I think your charge for the belt is a bunch of crap, it is nearly double of the HIGHEST price I found, which was $20-$25 higher than the average prices I found. Based on that alone, there is no way I could recommend, your otherwise FANTASTIC service, to anybody I know with a straight face. That’s just me being honest, because that’s who I am.

Ryan Fleming, Technician with Precision Door replaced a broken garage door spring at our home last night and I was so impressed with his knowledge, professionalism and positive attitude that I felt compelled to write this review. We have been customers of Precision Door for over 5 years and have always been pleased with how promptly and cost effectively they perform repair and maintenance work. I highly recommend both Ryan and Precision Door.read more

You depend on your garage doors to provide safety and security at your home or office. They are also great for enhancing your property’s curb appeal and increasing its value. With their many moving parts and how they operate, you must have access to a reliable service company when something goes wrong. Houston residents and businesses trust us to make sure their garage doors will work when they need it to.

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