Spring index lower limit: DASMA standard 102-2004 provides a lower limit of 6 for the spring index, which is symbol C in our formulas above (section 9.3). Other interesting items in this standard include an upper limit for how much the door sags when raised (no more than 1/120 of its width, section 9.2.1), that each of the two bottom brackets should sustain twice the door assembly's weight (section 9.2.2) for a total safety factor of about 4, and that the lift cables should provide a safety factor of 5.


Two of the spring references specifically for the garage-door industry are the APCO Spring Manual by Bill Eichenberger, and the Torsion Spring Rate Book by Clarence Veigel; these give tables of spring sizes and torque constants. Spring engineering principles in general are described in the Handbook of Spring Design published by the Spring Manufacturer's Institute; the formulas allow you to calculate torque constants knowing only the geometry and the Young's modulus of the material. You can also find some brief spring information in standard references like Machinery's Handbook and Marks' Standard Handbook for Mechanical Engineers.
GUESS YOU DON’T CARE to reply to my emails, so I'm posting it up here..... On Sep 8, 2018, at 2:52 PM, Joe Turiczek wrote: Thanks for the invoice, thanks for the service, thanks for the rapid response, thanks for Chris (the tech), but one note….. I’m a really handy guy, I repair and maintain nearly everything around the house, I am very mechanically adept, and I am also a highly skilled technical person that runs my own business by trade. I would have and could have repaired the belt myself, but I am traveling for business sooner than I could have ordered a belt, and did the repair….which means, I looked at the belts, I watched all the videos, it’s an EASY repair. I have belts down to a science, I’m really not an armchair DIY repair guy, I’m pretty good……That being said, I also shopped for prices of new belts for at least 30 mins or better, across easily 20-30 different parts and/or repair websites. Why am I telling you this? Because I think Chris, and your labor prices are spot on, and he deserved every cent, and your labor billing is more than fair…..however, I think your charge for the belt is a bunch of crap, it is nearly double of the HIGHEST price I found, which was $20-$25 higher than the average prices I found. Based on that alone, there is no way I could recommend, your otherwise FANTASTIC service, to anybody I know with a straight face. That’s just me being honest, because that’s who I am.

The disaster-is-nigh technique: As he inspects your door, the serviceman grimly calls your attention to "cracks" in your garage door. These appear very faintly in the middle of the door where the panels bow under their own weight when the door is up. This is normal, but the type of thing you wouldn't casually observe yourself. This surprising revelation disarms you, and you may find yourself strangely susceptible to the pitch for an entire new door.
The salesman-disguised-as-technician trick: In this trick, you arrange for a service call to your home, perhaps paying a small fee up-front, and a neatly uniformed man arrives in a very technical-looking truck, carrying an impressive tool kit. He carefully examines your door, perhaps using some impressive testing devices to lend weight to his expertise. He then condemns your door as not worth repairing, and tells you, to his sincere regret, that you must have a new one. In fact, this technician is not a technician, but a salesman who only sells, and does not repair, doors. Even if he doesn't sell you, he is doing well just collecting fees for service calls that are no more than sales visits. He doesn't actually have to ever fix anything, and he may not even be capable of doing so himself. He's an expert at selling, which genuine technicians are not. In the worst case, when you refuse to buy a whole new door, he might refuse to follow up with a visit from an actual technician, either outright, or only with an unacceptable delay ("we're too busy to get a guy out until next week", when your car is trapped). If you find yourself closing in on this situation, then politely invite him to leave, and try someone else. That is your right, and in fact the only power you have to bargain in such circumstances. At that point, he may offer to promptly bring in his competent colleague, who will turn up lacking charm and looking awful, but might actually do the work, possibly at a fair price. If so, you will have beaten a legal variation of the classic illegal bait-and-switch (see below). The switch was attempted, but not required, which makes this legal. This is a hazard of any direct-sales situation. Because it rarely appears in everyday retail sales, it can surprise the unwary.
A knowledgeable installer with good inventory can offer you upgraded spring lifetimes by using longer, heavier springs than were originally installed. For example, you may be offered more expensive springs with expected lifetimes of 15, 25, or even 100 thousand cycles, instead of the standard 10 thousand. The difference in labor to substitute this upgrade is nil. Since the dealer's cost of springs is proportional to weight, and typically a small part of the job price anyway, the dealer's cost for this upgrade is slight. This would seem to be a excellent option to offer every customer, and if correctly calculated and reasonably priced, one that you should take as cost-effective. Yet you may not be offered such an upgrade, if the installer is not adept at making the rather simple calculations, or if the optional springs are not on his truck, or if you're not around to be asked, or if the installer just doesn't like selling or taking time to discuss such details.

In order for you to find the right style door for your home, you need a tool that allows you to try out available options on a picture that approximates the look of your home. Using the Precision Door Designer, you'll easily create combinations of color, panel design and windows options that quickly educate you about the right style door for your home
I repeat my caution about the uncertainty of interpreting color codes. A professional installer reading this page emailed me to say that the red color indicates the springs are right-hand windings, not the DASMA color code for the wire size. But this photo shows both a right- and a left-hand spring, and both have the red paint on the cones and set-screws. I conclude it is prudent to make your own measurements and analysis. Do not rely on the colors on old installations. The only time I would respect them would be on new parts that carried documentation giving the code.
The Lifestyle garage door screen is a fully retractable garage screen door that works with your existing garage door. The Lifestyle features an industry first, fully retractable passage door for ease of entry and exit without having to retract the entire system. The Lifestyle garage screen is fully spring loaded, making opening and closing quick and easy.

This page is a description of how I replaced torsion springs on a garage door. You may find that my experience either frightens you from trying such a stunt yourself, or encourages you to give it a try. You may curse me for revealing the techniques supposedly known only to the trade, or perhaps thank me for explaining how it's done. All the secrets are revealed below. Even if you hire this work out, just knowing how it is done will help you shop for the best deal and avoid falling prey to overcharging tricks.


In order for you to find the right style door for your home, you need a tool that allows you to try out available options on a picture that approximates the look of your home. Using the Precision Door Designer, you'll easily create combinations of color, panel design and windows options that quickly educate you about the right style door for your home
Smart garage door openers aren't as expensive or hard to find as you might think. In fact, no matter what smart home platform you're using, there is an opener that will work for you. Smart garage door controllers add convenience like remote access, voice control, scheduling and vehicle detection to your garage door. You'll never need to wonder if you left it open ever again. 

Loosening or tightening the set-screws is the moment of most risk, since the end-wrench is a potential missile if you slip, and your hand is close to the cone. When the wrench is removed and only the rods are in place, it would seem that the worst that could happen is that the rod is flung out and the captive spring and cone rattle around, assuming you are keeping yourself clear of the rod's radial disk of rotation, and not leaning on the rod such as to fall into the apparatus were the rod to slip out of your grasp. The torsion shaft design has the virtue of capturing the mass of the spring and cones reliably on the shaft, preventing these parts from launching themselves as projectiles, even in an accident.


Garage door springs come in two styles: torsion (see above), which mounts on the header above the door, and extension (Photo 1), which floats above the upper roller track. In the past, extension springs were safer to install but didn’t have containment cables running through the center of the spring. Without cable, these springs become dangerous, heavy whips when they break. They also tend to be noisier than torsion springs, and we recommend you use them only if you don’t have the 12 in. of headroom above the door that a torsion spring requires.
Over the past 15 years, we've been providing professional garage door repair and services to families across the Lehigh Valley and Western New Jersey. We're a family-owned business, and we treat every customer as if they are family as well. We pride ourselves on our dedication to exceptional service. If you are having an issue with your garage door, we can help! We service ALL makes and models of garage doors and openers. Whether you need a repair, a replacement, or routine maintenance, you can rely on us to get the job done at an affordable price.

Lift cable placement: On the standard residential door mechanism, the loops at the lower ends of the two lift cables loop over the two bottom roller shafts which project from the bottom bracket on the door. The upper cable ends fasten to the drums using one of the methods described above. The drums are positioned along the torsion shaft such that the inner edge of each drum is approximately over the edge of the door. The cable winds onto the drum from outside in, so at the top of travel the cable is winding onto the inner edge of the drum, vertical from the edge of the door where it is looped over the roller shaft. As the door is lowered, the cable winds out to the outer edge of the drum, and thus is a bit out from the vertical, but the cable still falls in the gap between the guide rails and door edge. My cables rub and slap on the rails a bit, but after 30 years and many 10,000s of cycles, they don't seem to have worn at all.
Since 1989, Henderson Garage Doors has specialized in the sale, installation, service and repair of residential and commercial door systems throughout the Baytown area. A family-owned and operated company, we’re committed to offering the finest products and delivering best in class service. We’re proud of our reputation for prompt, professional, and reliable service and we’d like to welcome you to the Henderson Family!
Clopay Garage doors featuring Intellicore insulation technology represent Clopay Garage doors featuring Intellicore insulation technology represent the ultimate smart choice for homeowners. Clopay Intellicore is proprietary polyurethane foam that is injected into a garage door expanding to fill the entire structure. The result is a door with incredible strength and durability. Its dense insulation also produces a quieter ...  More + Product Details Close
Depending on the design, you can know in advance how many turns are going to have to be unwound. Lifting a 7-foot door by winding a cable on a 4-inch diameter (about 1 foot circumference) drum requires about 7 turns, plus one extra turn to maintain cable tension at the top-of-travel. Maintaining tension at the top-of-travel is critical; without it the cable will jump off the drum, requiring a serious repair.
A rolling code is a protocol used by garage door openers to keep your door safe and secure. When the radio signals from your remote control are broadcast to your garage door opener, it uses a specific code to communicate. Older models used the same code every time, making garage door openers vulnerable to burglars using a radio frequency identifier device. 
An extension spring counterbalance system consists of a pair of stretched springs running parallel to the horizontal tracks. The springs lift the door through a system of pulleys and counterbalance cables running from the bottom corner brackets through the pulleys. When the door is raised, the springs contract, thus lifting the door as the tension is released. Typically these springs are made of 11 gauge galvanized steel, and the lengths of these springs are based on the height of the garage door in question. Their lifting weight capacity can best be identified by the color that is painted on the ends of the springs.
I repeat my caution about the uncertainty of interpreting color codes. A professional installer reading this page emailed me to say that the red color indicates the springs are right-hand windings, not the DASMA color code for the wire size. But this photo shows both a right- and a left-hand spring, and both have the red paint on the cones and set-screws. I conclude it is prudent to make your own measurements and analysis. Do not rely on the colors on old installations. The only time I would respect them would be on new parts that carried documentation giving the code.
If you are a own a home or a business and you have to make repairs to existing doors or complete a replacement you may not need to apply for permits for these small jobs.  I have provided a link here to the Mecklenburg County permit office. You can use this site to conduct research and to decide if you should apply for a permit for your next project.
The garage door opener traditionally has been a simple device. And it still is for the most part. But as with a lot of household items, technological advances are finding their way into garage door opener hardware. There are quite a few cool features in modern garage door openers, some of which are things you never knew you needed to automate the process of opening and closing a garage door.
Started in 2004, Aladdin Garage Doors has become known nationwide as the trusted source for garage doors, repairs, and fast, efficient service. With a mission focused on delivering outstanding customer care, we’re proud to offer garage doors that lead the industry in quality, value, and lifetime protection for homes and businesses. Whatever your garage door needs may be, you can count on Aladdin Garage Doors to offer:
Resetting the drums, if needed: If the drums were incorrectly set in their old positions, one must reset both drums in new positions on the shaft. This is complicated by the presence of old dimples in the torsion shaft from previous setting(s), which must be avoided lest they improperly influence the new setting of the drums. To begin this process of resetting the drums, the door must first be lowered and resting level on the floor, the spring(s) must be in the unwound condition with their set-screws loosened, and the lift cables wrapped around the drums. If for some reason the door does not rest level on the floor, such as the floor being uneven, then insert temporary shims between the door bottom and the floor to bring the door up to level. Loosen the set-screws on the drums, and turn the torsion shaft to avoid the old dimples from the set-screws in the old drum position. Tighten the set-screw on the left drum (that is, on your left as you face the door from in the garage), creating a new dimple, and apply tension to its cable with the locking-pliers technique, enough tension to keep the cable taut but not enough to start to move the door up. Attach and wind the cable on the opposite (right) drum by hand until the cable is similarly taut, and set the screw, remembering that tightening the screw will tend to add a bit of extra tension to the cable. Both drums should now be fixed on the torsion shaft, with the cables about equally taut (listen to the sound when you pluck them like a guitar string) and the door still level on the ground. Setting the left drum first, and the right drum second, will allow you to take up any slack in the cable introduced by the left drum rotating slightly with respect to the torsion shaft as you tighten the set screws. This alignment and balance of the cables, drums, and door is critical to smooth operation and proper closing. If you have a single-spring assembly, the distance along the torsion tube from the spring cone to one drum is longer than to the other drum, which allows a bit more twist to one side than the other, and you may have to compensate with the setting of the drums.

Recently another type of opener, known as the jackshaft opener, has become more popular. This style of opener was used frequently on commercial doors but in recent years has been adapted for residential use. This style of opener consists of a motor that attaches to the side of the torsion rod and moves the door up and down by simply spinning the rod. These openers need a few extra components to function safely for residential use. These include a cable tension monitor, to detect when a cable is broken, and a separate locking mechanism to lock the door when it is fully closed. These have the advantage that they free up ceiling space that an ordinary opener and rail would occupy. These also have the disadvantage that the door must have a torsion rod to attach the motor to.
The parts, parts, parts trick: You might be told you need new rollers, cables, drums, bearings, etc., when you don't, or at highly inflated prices. Good questions to ask when first calling for service include, "How do I know you will only charge me for the parts I actually need?", and "If you don't have all the parts I need, what will you charge me to come back?"
I was careful not to assume that the previous installation correctly oriented the right- and left-hand springs on the correct sides of the center bearing plate. They could have been installed backwards by an incompetent installer, resulting in them having been wound looser (larger diameter coil) instead of tighter (smaller diameter coil) than when in their relaxed state, and if so I would have corrected them on the new installation. The proper orientation of the springs applies their reaction torque from tighter winding such that it turns the drums to lift the door. Verifying this is a rather simple exercise in mechanical visualization, but does require some care to be certain of correctness. If you were to install the springs backwards, and then start to wind them in the wrong direction, then the torsion bar will start winding the drums backwards, and not holding against the vise pliers, which should be obvious to inspection. Winding a spring backwards also tends to screw the spring off the cones; this error cannot proceed too far before the spring slips off the cones.
Garage door frames and mouldings will freshen up the appearance of your garage and garage door. We offer frames in a broad assortment of finishes and widths, so you can find the perfect fit for your garage. Update or repair the hardware on your garage door with our wide selection of our garage door parts and accessories. Some of the accessories we offer include cables, hinges, reinforcement brackets, and locking door handles.
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